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30.6.16

Let Go

The Bridge
By Donny Shankle

Quite often the personal record you are going after is already within your reach. You are well trained. You are strong. You are ready to lift the weight in front of you. However, something in your mind is frightening you from making it real. Or maybe you are setting this new standard as a near impossibility. The reality ends up being you never cross the threshold and make the personal record and sometimes the negative connotations of this have very real consequences.

Weightlifting is a race against gravity. For all athletes regardless of their discipline, it is also a race against time. You will not always be as strong as you are today. Make the lift happen either in training or competition. If you keep setting it up in your head as too difficult, too heavy, or impossible then it always will be. You will miss your chance to become a champion.

If you ever get the chance to visit Maui, go to Iao Valley and have a swim in its waters. Relaxing in the cool streams and having the water run over your shoulders is great recovery especially in-between training sessions.

On one occasion as I was walking to the streams to go for a swim, I watched a few of the locals jumping off the bridge which gives you access into the interior of the valley. The bridge was about 25ft. high over a 7ft. deep pool. The pool was not very wide either and was surrounded by jagged volcanic rock. These guys didn’t care. They were doing an assortment of aerial tricks before hitting the water to impress the tourists and earn themselves a little beer money for the night.

My friend James who I went with dared me to jump off the bridge. Since I’m not a fan of high places, I told him he was nuts and kept walking. Then I heard a splash. I turned around and couldn’t see him! He jumped off! I peered over the edge and saw him climbing up the rocks. He made his way all the back to me and asked me what was the problem . Was I afraid? If so, why?

He explained to me how to enter the water at an angle to avoid hitting the bottom. This would keep me from landing flat on my back. I wanted to ask him to do it again but I knew this wouldn’t be fair. It was my turn. It was my turn to have brass balls. The toughest thing in front of me was simply letting go of the ledge. I had to let go and fall. After holding onto the barrier and getting close to letting go a few times, I finally said the hell with it and took my hand off.

I didn’t enter the water as planned. As a result, I hit the bottom pretty hard. I was OK though. I was actually more than OK. I wanted to do it again. My skin felt like leather from my terrible dive after hitting the water so hard. I didn’t care though. The rush I felt was invigorating. It was exciting to overcome something which in my mind I built up as scary but in fact was simple. On my next jump, I landed perfectly at an angle and didn’t touch the bottom at all.

Afterwards, James told me that was the first time he ever jumped off. It was cool to do that together with my friend and our training session later that day was full of personal records. Why? I know why for me at least. It’s because I learned in that moment to let go and not be afraid. I could do it. I could land right. Was it dangerous? Sure. But what did that mean? It meant do it right.

As you go after the personal record let go and do it right. Draw on an experience you’ve gone through to give you courage or make you aggressive. I’m not telling you to go jump off bridges. This was an experience which worked for me. After that day, anytime I pulled a weight I knew I could complete the lift. My mind was strong. My time in Iao on that day always stayed with me. I always went under the bar with a sense of purpose because I was OK when I let go of my barriers and fell from the bridge.

I created the bridge mentality with the help of a good friend. Only champions possess this attitude. This mentality finds a way across the barriers in the gym and that is weightlifting. It’s about doing what you need to do to find a way and never ever stopping. It’s about finding a way to keep moving forward.

Think about an experience you’ve lived to help you think this way. As you keep practicing this,  you become fearless on the platform, full of ego, pride and determination. You stop thinking so much and let go. All these thoughts and questions in your mind will only keep you from improving. You’re already capable of the personal record. You’re already stronger than you think you are. It’s the place between your ears which gets in the way.

Let go and do it right.